Serenity

Let's try this again

Brenda Rodriguez hired me to write a paper. She agreed to pay $125.

Now shes lying about her professor rrjecting the paper.

If you are teaching a childhood psychology or development class and your student turned in thus paper, i wrote it

My name is tim. I am a freelance writer available for resumes, thesis editing, etc.

And brenda Rodriguez is a plagiarism case



Brenda May 9
Introduction
One of the most long lasting controversies is childhood development is spanking. Spanking is the act of slapping a child on the bottom in a way that hurts slightly but mostly humiliates and lets the child know that they are misbehaving. For some, this is a harmless act that disciplines without causing damaging, something that adults pay for in the more discerning clubs. For others, this is child abuse and should never be employed against any child ever. In this paper, I will discuss the arguments in favor of and against spanking.

Pro-Spanking Arguments
There are two major arguments in favor of spanking. The first is that spanking is disciplined and children need to be disciplined. Often we see an incorrigible adult and think that someone should have spanked them when they were children. Or we see children running around screaming while their parents threaten to put them in “time out.” Only their parents never put them in time out and they continue to scream.
When it comes to attachment theory, there are some who argue that spanking does not control behavior. In fact, it makes behavior worse. However, we can dispute several the arguments against spanking as beliefs more than researched outcomes. According to some “the experience of being spanked and thus physically hurt by their parents can interfere with children’s closeness to and trust of their parents, which in turn undermines parents’ socialization messages about appropriate behavior” (Gershoff et al 2018, p. 110). However, this negative socialization tends to be more theoretical than actual. People with distant relationships with their parents have upbringings that range from abusive to perfectly cordial without corporal punishment. Furthermore, there are many who have close relationships with their parents who do not see spanking as distancing. In many ways, the spanking is not as important as the rationales for spanking and the context of the spanking.
An argument for spanking is the acceptance of spanking as a form of punishment of those who had been spanked as children. “Adolescents who had been spanked by their mothers were more accepting of it than other adolescents” (Afifi et al 2022, p. 3) This is not the same story when it comes to child. People who grew up being punched or kicked or severely beaten when they were children do think of that as a positive part of their childhoods. In fact, they either do everything they can to prevent repeating that behavior or they feel shame when they beat their own children.
Adolescents and adults who were spanked as children are generally fine with spanking. They are not fine with beating or verbal abuse. They certainly don't wish that their parents had killed them. Whatever their relationship with their parents, spanking was not a negative factor.
The second argument in favor of spanking is cultural. Not every culture views spanking as child abuse. More importantly, parents who spank their children should not be placed in the same category as parents who try to drown their children in the bathtub or parents who chain their children to radiators whenever company comes over. There is a great deal of literature that assumes that spanking is just as bad as physical violence (hitting, punching, breaking arms, etc.)
Trevor Noah has a comedy routine about how a school in Africa promised Oprah Winfrey that they wouldn't spank their students. And then turned around and continued to beat their students because spanking is a cute little act and the students need way more punishment if they are ever going to behave.
This might actually be an argument against spanking since people who accept spanking as a corporal punishment may see it as a small punishment on the way to greater punishments. Even as spanking is a common form of punishment, there's a great deal of evidence that really doesn't bear out when it comes to negative outcomes.
For example, one study on spanking tried to draw a correlation between spanking and socioeconomic development. “Results from multilevel models show that reports of spanking of children in the household were associated with lower scores on a 3-item socioemotional development index among 3- and 4-year-old children. Country-level results from the multilevel model showed 59 countries (95%) had a negative relationship between spanking and socioemotional development and 3 countries (5%) had a null relationship. Spanking was not associated with higher socioemotional development for children in any country.” (Pace et al 2019). Again we have a scale of socio-emotional development that was put forth by a wealthy “first world” privilege and applied to poorer nations.
Again, correlation and causation are too far apart to truly give an argument. There are many reasons why a child who grows up in a lower to middle income country would have poor coping skills including poverty, discrimination, exploitation

Anti-Spanking Arguments
One of the first arguments against spanking is the moral argument. For many, there is no moral justification for hitting a child no matter the context. This argument posits that any arguments about hitting a child from love or discipline are specious and self-serving. Many of the research studies associated with spanking take it as a shared assumption that spanking is harmful.
Often the studies will associate spanking with maltreatment including sexual and verbal abuse. “Child maltreatment has been consistently associated with a broad range of mental health problems, including depression or depressed mood, personality disorders, suicidal ideation and/or attempts, and substance use in adulthood. Similarly, numerous studies over the past 20 years have also found spanking to be associated with similar mental health problems in childhood and adulthood, including depression or depressed mood” (Afifi 2017, p. 25). One notices that the biases related to spanking are strong and Tracie O. Afifi who spearheaded this study also has cited many studies that she also made.
This seems like bad scholarship. These scholars are not starting with hypotheses and then testing them. They are starting with theories and then trying to make the scholarship fit their theories. So in the case of Afifi, she is trying to make a correlation between spanking and depressive health outcomes including suicidal ideation. However, she is also giving a great deal of information based on the fact that other childhood problems such as sexual abuse and domestic violence. Even when she finds a fact that might be a positive in relation to spanking such as adolescents having a positive attitude towards spanking, she's still trying to frame it as a negative.
This is not to say that spanking is great. There are plenty of adults who swear by it and we've all dated people who wanted to be spanked because it turns them on. The current Trump trial shows that Trump liked to be spanked, an image that no one wants in their head. However, spanking children is going to be problematic because it's shaming a child with a mild pain in order to make the child behave.
For some people, especially people of privilege who were raised by their nannies, spanking is a great evil that disgusts them. They are going to hate spanking no matter what. They probably have a point. Also no child wants to be spanked. They might later feel like it was ultimately a positive experience, especially in adolescence when their parents are not able to spank them, but they aren't happy with the experience when it's happening.
This brings us to the practical consideration. In this case, the discipline nature of spanking is counterproductive. “research to date has consistently found that spanking is linked with more externalizing behavior problems, such as aggression and conduct disorder.” (Gershoff et al, 2018, p. 110). Granted, correlation is not causation and an argument could be made that the externalizing behavior is causing the spanking and not vice versa.
Furthermore, “ACEs did not moderate the link between spanking and externalizing behavior, indicating that spanking worsens externalizing behavior regardless of exposure to other adversities.” (Ma et al 2021, p. 174). Of course, we also have to consider the question of whether the causation goes one way or the other. Do children who are spanked act out more or do children who are misbehaving get spanked more often?
The possibility that spanking leads to more behavior problems is always going to be an issue. We can say that spanking doesn't help, but we are not sure and the findings are largely inconclusive.

Conclusion
Whether or not spanking causes more behavior problems tends to be secondary to the notion that spanking is always wrong. In researching this paper, the author found several studies written by the same people who shared the same negative assumptions about spanking. As far as most researchers are concerned, spanking is a great evil and being spanked is going to just lead to more behavior problems. Claiming that spanking is child abuse is going to get a lot of agreement without much pushback. No one wants to be the person who states that spanking is good for children and that they spank their children, especially among people who think that spanking is automatically evil.
Overall, spanking seems to be counterproductive and not a great way to discipline, but for parents who spank their children the confusion between spanking and outright abuse seems specious at best. One probably should not spank one's children, but one should dial back the automatic condemnation of people who spank their children, as long as they only spank.


References
Afifi T.O., Ford D, Gershoff, E.T, Merrick M, Grogan-Kaylor A, Ports K.A. MacMillan H.L, Holden G.W., Taylor C.A, Lee, S.J, Bennett R.P. (2017). Spanking and adult mental health impairment: The case for the designation of spanking as an adverse childhood experience. Child Abuse & Neglect. 71: 24-31.

Afifi T.O, Salmon S, Stewart-Tufescu A, Tailileu T, Fortier J, MacMillian H, Durrant J, Holden, G.W. (2022). Associations between spanking beliefs and reported spanking among adolescents -parent/caregiver dyads in a Canadian sample. BMC Public Health 22(493). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-12856-z

Gershoff E.T., Sattler K.M.P, Ansari A. (2018). Strengthening causal estimates for links between spanking and children's externalizing behavior problems. Psychological Science 29(1): 110-120. DOI: 10.1177/0956797617729816

Ma J, Lee, S.J., Grogan-Kaylor A. (2021). Adverse childhood experiences and spanking have similar associations with early behavior problems. The Journal of Pediatrics 235.

Pace G.T, Lee S.J., Grogan-Kaylor A. (2019). Spanking and young chldren's socioemotional development in low- and middle-income countries. Child Abuse & Neglect 88: 84-95.
PIGGY!!!!

Brenda Rodriguez is trying to screw me. Another deadbeat client

Hi. Im tim. I write term papers for people. On friday o wrote a term paper for brenda Rodriguez

She claimed she couldnt use it and the professor didnt accept it.

Brenda Rodriguez is full of shit.

She owes me $125

If you teach brenda Rodriguez she hired me to write a paper.

I bet this looks familiar

Brenda May 9IntroductionOne of the most long lasting controversies is childhood development is spanking. Spanking is the act of slapping a child on the bottom in a way that hurts slightly but mostly humiliates and lets the child know that they are misbehaving. For some, this is a harmless act that disciplines without causing damaging, something that adults pay for in the more discerning clubs. For others, this is child abuse and should never be employed against any child ever. In this paper, I will discuss the arguments in favor of and against spanking. Pro-Spanking ArgumentsThere are two major arguments in favor of spanking. The first is that spanking is disciplined and children need to be disciplined. Often we see an incorrigible adult and think that someone should have spanked them when they were children. Or we see children running around screaming while their parents threaten to put them in “time out.” Only their parents never put them in time out and they continue to scream. When it comes to attachment theory, there are some who argue that spanking does not control behavior. In fact, it makes behavior worse. However, we can dispute several the arguments against spanking as beliefs more than researched outcomes. According to some “the experience of being spanked and thus physically hurt by their parents can interfere with children’s closeness to and trust of their parents, which in turn undermines parents’ socialization messages about appropriate behavior” (Gershoff et al 2018, p. 110). However, this negative
socialization tends to be more theoretical than actual. People with distant relationships with their parents have upbringings that range from abusive to perfectly cordial without corporal punishment. Furthermore, there are many who have close relationships with their parents who do not see spanking as distancing. In many ways, the spanking is not as important as the rationales for spanking and the context of the spanking. An argument for spanking is the acceptance of spanking as a form of punishment of those who had been spanked as children. “Adolescents who had been spanked by their mothers were more accepting of it than other adolescents” (Afifi et al 2022, p. 3) This is not the same story when it comes to child. People who grew up being punched or kicked or severely beaten when they were children do think of that as a positive part of their childhoods. In fact, they either do everything they can to prevent repeating that behavior or they feel shame when they beat their own children. Adolescents and adults who were spanked as children are generally fine with spanking. They are not fine with beating or verbal abuse. They certainly don't wish that their parents had killed them. Whatever their relationship with their parents, spanking was not a negative factor. The second argument in favor of spanking is cultural. Not every culture views spanking as child abuse. More importantly, parents who spank their children should not be placed in the same category as parents who try to drown their children in the bathtub or parents who chain their children to radiators whenever company comes over. There is a great deal of literature that assumes that spanking is just as bad as physical violence (hitting, punching, breaking arms, etc.) Trevor Noah has a comedy routine about how a school in Africa promised Oprah Winfrey that they wouldn't spank their students. And then turned around and continued to beat their students because spanking is a cute little act and the students need way more punishment if socialization tends to be more theoretical than actual. People with distant relationships with their parents have upbringings that range from abusive to perfectly cordial without corporal punishment. Furthermore, there are many who have close relationships with their parents who do not see spanking as distancing. In many ways, the spanking is not as important as the rationales for spanking and the context of the spanking. An argument for spanking is the acceptance of spanking as a form of punishment of those who had been spanked as children. “Adolescents who had been spanked by their mothers were more accepting of it than other adolescents” (Afifi et al 2022, p. 3) This is not the same story when it comes to child. People who grew up being punched or kicked or severely beaten when they were children do think of that as a positive part of their childhoods. In fact, they either do everything they can to prevent repeating that behavior or they feel shame when they beat their own children. Adolescents and adults who were spanked as children are generally fine with spanking. They are not fine with beating or verbal abuse. They certainly don't wish that their parents had killed them. Whatever their relationship with their parents, spanking was not a negative factor. The second argument in favor of spanking is cultural. Not every culture views spanking as child abuse. More importantly, parents who spank their children should not be placed in the same category as parents who try to drown their children in the bathtub or parents who chain their children to radiators whenever company comes over. There is a great deal of literature that assumes that spanking is just as bad as physical violence (hitting, punching, breaking arms, etc.) Trevor Noah has a comedy routine about how a school in Africa promised Oprah Winfrey that they wouldn't spank their students. And then turned around and continued to beat their students because spanking is a cute little act and the students need way more punishment if socialization tends to be more theoretical than actual. People with distant relationships with their parents have upbringings that range from abusive to perfectly cordial without corporal punishment. Furthermore, there are many who have close relationships with their parents who do not see spanking as distancing. In many ways, the spanking is not as important as the rationales for spanking and the context of the spanking. An argument for spanking is the acceptance of spanking as a form of punishment of those who had been spanked as children. “Adolescents who had been spanked by their mothers were more accepting of it than other adolescents” (Afifi et al 2022, p. 3) This is not the same story when it comes to child. People who grew up being punched or kicked or severely beaten when they were children do think of that as a positive part of their childhoods. In fact, they either do everything they can to prevent repeating that behavior or they feel shame when they beat their own children. Adolescents and adults who were spanked as children are generally fine with spanking. They are not fine with beating or verbal abuse. They certainly don't wish that their parents had killed them. Whatever their relationship with their parents, spanking was not a negative factor. The second argument in favor of spanking is cultural. Not every culture views spanking as child abuse. More importantly, parents who spank their children should not be placed in the same category as parents who try to drown their children in the bathtub or parents who chain their children to radiators whenever company comes over. There is a great deal of literature that assumes that spanking is just as bad as physical violence (hitting, punching, breaking arms, etc.) Trevor Noah has a comedy routine about how a school in Africa promised Oprah Winfrey that they wouldn't spank their students. And then turned around and continued to beat their students because spanking is a cute little act and the students need way more punishment if they are ever going to behave. This might actually be an argument against spanking since people who accept spanking as a corporal punishment may see it as a small punishment on the way to greater punishments. Even as spanking is a common form of punishment, there's a great deal of evidence that really doesn't bear out when it comes to negative outcomes. For example, one study on spanking tried to draw a correlation between spanking and socioeconomic development. “Results from multilevel models show that reports of spanking of children in the household were associated with lower scores on a 3-item socioemotional development index among 3- and 4-year-old children. Country-level results from the multilevel model showed 59 countries (95%) had a negative relationship between spanking and socioemotional development and 3 countries (5%) had a null relationship. Spanking was not associated with higher socioemotional development for children in any country.” (Pace et al 2019). Again we have a scale of socio-emotional development that was put forth by a wealthy “first world” privilege and applied to poorer nations. Again, correlation and causation are too far apart to truly give an argument. There are many reasons why a child who grows up in a lower to middle income country would have poor coping skills including poverty, discrimination, exploitationAnti-Spanking ArgumentsOne of the first arguments against spanking is the moral argument. For many, there is no moral justification for hitting a child no matter the context. This argument posits that any arguments about hitting a child from love or discipline are specious and self-serving. Many of the research studies associated with spanking take it as a shared assumption that spanking is socialization tends to be more theoretical than actual. People with distant relationships with their parents have upbringings that range from abusive to perfectly cordial without corporal punishment. Furthermore, there are many who have close relationships with their parents who do not see spanking as distancing. In many ways, the spanking is not as important as the rationales for spanking and the context of the spanking. An argument for spanking is the acceptance of spanking as a form of punishment of those who had been spanked as children. “Adolescents who had been spanked by their mothers were more accepting of it than other adolescents” (Afifi et al 2022, p. 3) This is not the same story when it comes to child. People who grew up being punched or kicked or severely beaten when they were children do think of that as a positive part of their childhoods. In fact, they either do everything they can to prevent repeating that behavior or they feel shame when they beat their own children. Adolescents and adults who were spanked as children are generally fine with spanking. They are not fine with beating or verbal abuse. They certainly don't wish that their parents had killed them. Whatever their relationship with their parents, spanking was not a negative factor. The second argument in favor of spanking is cultural. Not every culture views spanking as child abuse. More importantly, parents who spank their children should not be placed in the same category as parents who try to drown their children in the bathtub or parents who chain their children to radiators whenever company comes over. There is a great deal of literature that assumes that spanking is just as bad as physical violence (hitting, punching, breaking arms, etc.) Trevor Noah has a comedy routine about how a school in Africa promised Oprah Winfrey that they wouldn't spank their students. And then turned around and continued to beat their students because spanking is a cute little act and the students need way more punishment if
high school reunion

Another Asshole Client

In this case the client paid after claiming that they couldn't use the paaper. I actually tried to rewrite the paper and the client told me that I was a bad writer. Fuck that client. I'm a much better writer than the client. Fucking entitled shit.

ANyhow I charged $75 aand the client gave me $50. So the client is an asshole but not a total waste of time. Just in case the client tried to use the papers I wrote anyhow, here they are.

References
Fassin, Didier. 2014. “Petty States of Exception.” Perspectives from the Frontline of Policing, Counter-terrorism and Border Control. Edited by Mark Maguire. Pluto Press.


Then I was so pissed that the client said that I was a bad writer and unclear that I rewrote the paaper to make it even more cleara that it's fucking useless.

The client sent me an even nastier email about how they grew up in a dangerous neighborhood and then some bullshit about revolution. Because yeah, the insipid paper that I was writing about would help anything

Crone Drome April 9

INTRODUCTION
Decades after every rap song, television show and news cast told the world that the police were likely to engage in unfair policing when it comes to the poor and the minorities, Didler Fassin comes along to write “Petty States of Exception: The Contemporary Policing of the Urban Poor” to tell us that...policing is unfair to the poor. Oh no, he doesn't just say that. He engages in ethnographic research by riding around with police officers in the disadvataged Parisian urban districts. He did this during the 2000s and he claims to uncover a disparity between democratic ideals and the lived experience of the marginalized communities of Paris. His essay must have been a revelation to anyone who grew up in a wealthy suburb and never had a poor or black friend in their lives. However, beyond this obvious conclusion, Fassin also notes that the policing methods undermine security by intensifying the insecurity. Fassin concludes that democracy tends to work within a hegemony based on class and race with the police as the face of the oppression.

SCHOLARY ANALYSIS
The ultimate conclusion is that “inequalities have considerably increased in the past 30 years in France...the police make sure that everyone is reminded of his or her social position.” (p. 117). This is not news. I can imagine that the people who read Fassin living in a suburban enclave, sipping their aged Scotch and collectively dropping their monocles at this news, but in reality he's not saying much.
Still, Fassin needs to justify his tenure so he spends the first few paragraphs talking about the works of Carl Schmitt and his “political theology and his definition of sovereignty as the power to decide on the exception.” (p. 104). He gets a lot of mileage out of Schmitt's Nazi affiliation and the way that it works alongside the Patriot Act. He defines state of exception as the way that fascist governments suspend rights. Then he makes up the phrase “petty state of exception” (p. 105) in order to depict the way that the police treat minorities. He's very impressed with himself. He spends a rather long paragraph patting himself on the back for figuring out this “ironic” phrase.
Then finally after a long introduction, he gets to the meat of the article which is how racial incidents were made worse by the law and order crowd. In 2005, three teenage boys saw the police arresting someone and ran the other way. They were hungry from Ramadan and wanted to just get home. They tried to jump an electric fence and two of them died. This led to a massive riot and a protest. In isolation, they were just dumb kids who got electrocuted. However, the context of the police regularly harassing them made them the catalyst for riots and protests. Many cars were destroyed.
In order to preserve the democratic illusion, Nicholas Sarkozy acted like everyone's drunk uncle and said that the boys deserved it because they were thieves running away from the police. Sarkozy was the minister of the interior but he used the tragedy to ride his way to the presidency. Riots continued. A mosque was attacked. Chirac declared a state of emergency. “Within a week, 300 towns were affected: instead of direct confrontation between youth and the police, the protests involved setting fire to private cars.” (p. 107).
This was a problem when it came to property but the police interviewed by Fassin thought it was no big deal. The police are in charge of protecting property. They are often called in for burglaries and vandalism. They do the bidding of the propertied class. If your apartment gets robbed they will come over, fill out a report and then let you work it out with the insurance companies.
Fassin notes that there was an exaggerated “role of the media in the propagation of images, figures, and comments which caused much of the anxiety felt both in France and abroad.” (p. 108). So when the 2007 incident happened, the police were all out in force and there were more police than you can count. Don't even think about rioting today. In this case, two teenagers were riding a motorbike and “were killed in a collision with the vehicle of an anti-crime squad” (p. 109). Fassin is very confusing here. Did the cop car hit them. Did they hit the car? Who hit whom? Apparently the community believed that the cops were outright targeting the kids because they were playing a little game called “let's hit these Muslim teenagers” and they won. The violent protests happened for a bit and then everyone was out in force.
Sarkozy was president by this point and he was very much eager to show just how tough on crime he was. So when the cops were patrolling the poor neighborhoods, teenaagers threw things at them and tensions rose. The “driver received a six-month suspended sentence” (p. 109) for speeding. Again, no one knows what actually happened.

ETHNOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS
Then we get to the actual ride-arounds and we must say that Fassin's ethnographic research was important because it can change policy or it can make things better for the urban poor. Actually it can add to the body of academic literature that says that cops treat poor people and minorities unfairly. I assume that there is a peer reviewed journal called Stating the Obvious because Fassin doesn't actually get much data from watching the police officers beyond the fact that they drive around.
They don't arrest anyone in the act of committing crime. It's very hard to actually catch someone committing crimes. They aren't going to swoop in and stop that guy from robbing the local convenience store. They did catch a burglar once years ago. Mostly, they harass teenagers because that's their job. They find marijuana. They arrest them for marijuana as long as they are poor and not likely to sue the department.
Fassin sounds very optimistic when he says “The obsessiveness of successive government on the issue of immigration has reached a climax at the time of my research with the establishment of annual quotas of deportation” (p. 114). Sadly the undocumented immigrants increased because there were a few wars since then. I guess he thinks that his research will help people to understand that the cops are unfair and because the cops are unfair, he can get tenure.

CONCLUSION
Ultimately, Fassin is a useless academic writing a puerile article about things that almost everyone knows about. Oh sure, everyone has that racist aunt or high school classmate that thinks that poor people and minorities are all criminals and deserve to be harassed by the cops. However, the fact that he is riding along with cops to discover that they harass poor people and minorities in order to do their job is not exactly news. Maybe his audience is full of wealthy white people who think that life is fair and can be actually shocked. However, anyone who didn't grow up in privilege knows that the cops can be arbitrary in their harassment and often work to the detriment of the poor and minorities in order to maintain a shaky social order.

References
Fassin, Didier. 2014. “Petty States of Exception.” Perspectives from the Frontline of Policing, Counter-terrorism and Border Control. Edited by Mark Maguire. Pluto Press.
No big deal. I might put this on substack. Of course, I subscribed the asshole client. But I have too much to do in the next couple weeks. Pesach approaches.
high school reunion

Annoying non-clients

So I went back and forth with this crazy woman and it looked like she wanted me to write her entire paper for her, but then she only needed me to write an introduction.

She said 5000 words. I assumed she meant 500 words. I quoted $50

Then she said she needed 1500 words so obviously I increased the price.

Then she went back to 500 words and I said "yes, ok if it's only 500 words, $50"

And then she sent nasty emails telling me that I was a scammer.

So that's fun.

I'm posting her email because she wouldn't fucking stop.

I can post more emails.

Apparently she's also a tattoo model.

Ugly fucking tattoos. I guess this degree is when that fails and she has to go into the restaurant business or whatever.

[Also, I fucking hate freelancing. I've been doing it since 2008 and the sense of entitlement due to these fuckers using ChatGPT and thinking that I should charge starvation wages is fucking ridiculous. I need a real writing job. Real blog over at Dreamwidth and Tumblr]

Katrina Stylez

From:
katrina.stylez@gmail.com
To:
Tim Lieder

Mon, Mar 18 at 9:21 PM

Tim,

You changed your font way too many times for my liking. If you would had been more CONSISTENT maybe you could SCAM more college students but instead you’re using an AI generator and MISSPELLED simple words such as CONFIRM!

FYL: Just because you have link attachments on every single email that doesn’t make you APPEAR as if you’re a legit person.

One 1 thing: NOBODY USES YAHOO AS A REAL EMAIL WHEN CONDUCTING BUSINESS IN 2024!🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

This is what you like to do to people online? Expose students if you don’t get paid?
PIGGY!!!!

You know the drill. College professors take note

I was hired by Jared Gonzalez
--------------
jared gonzalez

From:
jaredgonz1999@yahoo.com
To:
omanlieder@yahoo.com

Fri, Feb 23 at 5:08 PM


Hi. I find your email in this app called Reddit I was wondering if you are available to do a paper work for me? Thank you

-----------------
jared gonzalez hires people to write his term papers. He couldn't pay for his own paper so I post his paper. So jared gonzalez hires people to write his term papers and if you have a student named jared gonzalez then you know that he engages in plagiarism. I wrote this paper for jared gonzalez and jared gonzalez is not paying me. I really wish that jared gonzalez because I'd rather have jared gonzalez's money than his academic career.

But maybe jared gonzalez shouldn't go to college if he can't write his own damn papers. I mean I have plenty of clients who can't write their own damn papers, but they are smart enough to actually pay me.

jared gonzalez is a deadbeat.



If this looks familiar its because i wrote it. One of your students hired me to write it.

Your student also didnt pay me.


Introduction
Applied Behavior Analysis is a form of behavioral engineering theoretically meant to improve social skills and normalize behavior with many different attempts to use stimuli and punishment. The original name for ABA was behavior modification. In recent years, it has come under attack by members of the Autistic Spectrum Community who claim that it is an abusive attempt to force “normal” behavior. Still there are several ways that ABA can be applied.

Features
There are several features of ABA. ABA is based on the concept that by recognizing and working on certain behaviors, the individual can better fit into the societal expectation. A parent or a therapist may “choose specific behaviors to work on, set clear goals, and use consistent rewards and positive methods to encourage good behavior and discourage challenging ones during daily activities.” (Tatom) ABA is basically psychotherapy and pedagogy as it seeks to teach children, mostly autistic children to “act normally,” with behaviors that don't make people uncomfortable.
ABA is also used for children with behavioral issues, phobias, and addictions. A great deal of ABA involves reward and punishment. However, ABA also “seeks to understand why someone behaves in a certain manner so that more effective solutions can be created. It is also important to note that while reinforcement and consequences are part of ABA therapy, they should be used responsibly” (Elias 2023).
ABA is mostly concerned with unwanted behavior but also seeks to encourage people to complete tasks. For example, one of the goals for autistic children may involve making eye contact. So the ABA would work on that eye contact. ABA would also make an effort to understand why neurodivergent individuals do not want to make eye contact, find eye contact creepy, state that they don't believe in premarital eye contact in a way that doesn't necessarily sound like they are joking. Maybe then they can make eye contact with greater ease.
Many believe that ABA is an effective treatment for ASD to help ASD students into the mainstream of the school curriculum. “School-based practitioners should aim to implement evidence-based behavior management strategies that have been proven to be effective for students with ASD. A robust literature base supports the use of many approaches, including applied behavior analysis” (White 2014, p. 85)

Three Pillars of ABA
The three pillars of ABA are stimulus, behavior and response. A stimulus can be negative or positive. When one is treating someone using ABA, stimulus, one can use negative stimuli like electric shock in order to provide a stimulus that keeps someone away. Or one can have an associative stimuli such as Pavlov's Dog salivating upon hearing a bell ring.
Stimulus was parodied in the South Park movie where Cartman was given a device that administered an electric shock every time he used profanity. By the end of the movie he had used so much profanity that he was able to shoot lightning bolts. This is not how stimulus works in ABA therapy but it is a popular conception and it can illustrate the debate over stiumuls.
Behavior is the key to ABA. With ABA, the individual is being trained to behave in a certain way and this behavior is being moved in one direction by response and stimuli.
Response is the way that ABA controls people. You say a word. Someone hits you on the hand. That's the response. Your stimuli is negative.
Another example of stimuli, response and behavior is daily report cards (DRC). “The DRC is an operationalized list of a child’s target behaviors (e.g., interrupting, noncompliance, academic productivity), and it includes specific criteria for meeting each behavioral goal (e.g., “interrupts three or fewer times during math instruction”). Teachers provide immediate feedback to the child regarding target behaviors on the DRC.” (Pyle & Fabiano 2017). The behavior is the type of behavior shown by the child with ADHD. The response is the report card. The stimulus is the reward or punishment in regards to the DRC.

Classical vs. Operant Conditioning
Stimuli and responses are the way that ABA conditions the patients. Also conditioning is something that happens throughout our daily lives. Our mothers scream at us to do the dishes and we do the dishes and this is a type of conditioning. We grow up reading sexist books that depict men and women in some kind of blood feud for supremacy and this affects our attitude toward dating. Other types of conditioning can occur in regards to sitmuli. If you eat pasta and throw up, you might feel nauseous when you are served pasta again. This is regardless of whether the first pasta dish that made you vomit was spoiled.
Pavlov's dog is the quintessential example of classical conditioning. The dog associated the bell with food and salivated when hearing the bell. If a child is exposed to a dog that bites the child, the child may associate barking with danger.
Operant conditioning is a more important part of conditioning. With operant conditioning, the person being conditioned is encouraged to actively participate in their conditioning. “Operant conditioning may be more obvious since the consequences and reinforcement are apparent. Classical conditioning can be more insidious or unknown.”(Arzt & Fuller 2023).
An example of operant conditioning happens in brainwashing, such as with Mao's army where every member was supposed to confess to their sins and to the sins of their comrades. Those who resisted the conditioning were pushed out of the group and needed to find other things to do. Those who remained in Mao's army kept confessing their sins and their comrade's sins so much that they were completely under the thrall of the party. They didn't contribute anything but their obedience. Later Maoist purges such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution would continue this conditioning with younger party members turning in their older comrades for being counterrevolutionaries and spies.
Reinforcement
Reinforcement is an important part of life. We all reinforce our behaviors on a daily basis. We brush our teeth in the morning if he want to have fresh breath and save money on dentists. Setting an alarm is a type of reinforcement. Negative reinforcement means that you are putting something off.
Exercise can be both positive and negative reinforcement. It's negative because you are trying to lose weight and put off the death that awaits for just a little longer. If you exercise regularly, you are less likely to die of a heart attack or develop diabetes. However, it is also positive because it gets the blood pumping and the endorphins going.
If you are not likely to exercise, you can use more reinforcement such as music so you are dancing on the treadmill or television so that you can catch upon your favorite anime. This is always personal and part of the program.
Ideally reinforcement should be personal. One of the issues with neurodivergence is that reinforcement is not as easy. With ADHD or ASD, one has to remind oneself to do all the things every day and even use other forms of reinforcement.

Schedules of Reinforcement
Schedules of reinforcement are tools used for neurodivergent people to schedule their time and their activities so that they are getting key goals addressed. Someone with ADHD might need fixed intervals of reinforcement to make sure that they do certain things. They can set alarms and also set aside time for busy work. There are also ways of tokens that help people to understand themselves.

Conclusion
Even though there are ABA critics who note that ABA might be used to force people into artificial normalcy, there are some benefits to ABA. ABA does help people to condition themselves into dealing with responsibilities and social interactions. Furthermore, ABA will allow people to schedule their time in a comprehensive manner.




References
Arzt N &Fuller K. (2023). Classical vs. operant conditioning: What is the difference? Choosing Therapy. Retrieved from https://www.choosingtherapy.com/classical-vs-operant-conditioning/

Elias M (2023) Is ABA therapy only for autism? Six myths. Discovery ABA Therapy. Retrieved from https://www.discoveryaba.com/aba-therapy/myths

Pyle K & Fabiano G.A. (2017) Daily report card intervention and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A meta-analysis of single-case studies. Exceptional Children 83(4). 378-395. DOI: 10.1177/0014402917706370


Tatom C. (2023) The 7 dimensions and core principles of ABA. Autism Parenting Magazine. Retrieved from https://www.autismparentingmagazine.com/aba-principles/

White, S. E. (2014). Special Education Complaints Filed by Parents of Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders in the Midwestern United States. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 29(2), 80-87. https://doi.org/10.1177/1088357613478830
high school reunion

Books Read in 2021 # 77-80 - I got to take these back to the lirbary

77.The White Snake by Ben Nadler - I actually thought this was going to be the other White Snake legend, the Chinese one. Instead it's the Grimm Brothers. In this case the white snake is dead and eating the white snake helps the protagonist hear birds and fish and the like. It's a standard story of a peasant who becomes king because he has magic powers. The author purposefully made the princess into a smart character who can run things better. The illustrations are great but I don't recognize the style. Or I recognize that it is a particular style but I don't know which one.

78.Park Bench by Chaboute - This one starts slowly and I was not on board but when I finally got into it I had to go back and read it again. The characters keep coming back to the park bench and you see them unravel or move forward. THere's a business man who walks past it until one day he sits down and takes off his shoes. THere's a homeless man who keeps getting run off by police officers. There are lovers and skate punks and people just there to read. The ending where bench gets replaced by a bullshit hostile architecture bench is actually pretty heartbreaking.

79 & 80. Jupiter's Legacy vol 1 & 2 by Mark Millar & Wilfredo Torres - So the deconstruction of superheroes continues but with them back in the 50s dealing with government interference and the FBI is just not as much of a hook as the original series. It's great to see that one character is gay and the team backs him up to the point that Skyfox blackmails J. Edgar Hoover. And Skyfox doesn't so much turn villain as has a fight with Walter. Walter is the villain of the original series and he's the villain in this one as well but he's more manipulative than outright evil. Skyfox does not so much turn bad as gets driven out by Walter and then when they almost reconcile, Walter drives him out again. Also Skyfox cares more about racial tensions and the underdog so his heel turn is actually a reevaluation of the white supremacist time period. In other words, he's really not a villain.

ANyhow the hook of the children having to grow up is not here. So it feels more like a Watchmen clone. http://www.patreon.com/timlieder
high school reunion

Books read in 2021 # 76 - Cordwainer Smith is the Golden Age of Science Fiction

76. Norstrilla by Cordwainer Smith - I don't know if it started when I was reading comics with crossover events or if it came later but I absolutely LOVE when stories and novels interconnect. From Balzac to Love & Rockets, I'm a sucker for characters showing up in other stories and being recontextualized. So Balzac's most clever villain is a mephisto character in one book, a rather pathetic but still manipulative guy in Pierre Goriot and a walk-on character who helps a character meet a poisoner in Cousin Bette. I'm currently working on a series of stories that take place in the near future, based on the book of Genesis where I keep killing off Dayton, Ohio.

So Cordwainer Smith is definitely in that wheelhouse. I read his short stories last year or the year before and I was shocked by how progressive he was for a Golden Age science fiction writer. Having read so much Heinlein and Asimov, I'm always certain that I'm going to have to deal with casual sexism and racism when I'm reading from that era. Instead I found some truly wonderful and imaginative stories with compelling women characters. When I finally wrote about him I ended up writing a revisionist history take https://timlieder1.medium.com/science-fiction-has-always-been-greater-than-campbell-82ccb66ecd70 where I celebrated the Golden Age writers outside the Campbell bubble.

However, one problem with the connected stories is the way that you read them feeling like you missed something. That actually is a bigger problem with novels like this one where Smith includes references to his other work including C'Mell, the Littul Kittens and the Lady of Clown Town to the point where you want to look up these other stories and see what you missed. Mostly it's just context, but I completely forgot about the Littul Kittens story which is actually about Norstrilla's security system. The fact that they reference it without saying anything else made me go "Oh yeah, I kind of remember that story but not really".

The novel is pretty straightforward. A resident of Norstrilla - an extremely wealthy but purposefully rustic planet because it's the only place that makes immortality juice - is an outcast because his telepathy isn't developed and he's on his last chance not to get killed as useless. Barely surviving that trial, he finds out that another person is trying to kill him so he uses his super computer to become extremely wealthy by manipulating the market. And buy the planet Earth.

The book is basically a travelogue of the world building of Smith. He takes you from Nostrilla to Earth to the underground of Earth where the animal people live. He introduces you to the characters that he'd develop more fully in other books. And finally he creates a post-capitalist society.

This isn't as great as his short stories but it's a decent introduction. I don't know if you should read it first or last. I guess reading it after reading the collection is not a bad idea. http://www.patreon.com/timlieder
Spinning Tardis

Books read in 2021 # 71-75 - Ok, let's just get this over with.

71. The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey by Walter Mosley - It's the end of the year when what began as a fun experiment turns into a chore. Of course, the fact that my clients are coming out of the woodwork to give me way more work than I can handle (but I handle it. I handle it) really pushes this one to the backburner. And the really insightful reviews that I was striving for in January fall by the wayside. Now it seems like I'm rushing to catch up as this will be the first year since I started this experiment where I've read fewer than 100 books. I could blame that on the door stop that is The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire but also I really got caught up in Toon Blast. Damn pattern based games hit me right in the ADHD. I would blame them if it mattered how many books I've read but I'm an adult and no one is grading me on this thing (and besides I count graphic novels which don't take that long to read).

So this book - beautiful prose. Excellent prose. Ptolemy Grey is a scared old man with dementia who keeps getting mugged by the local wino, a character who gets steadily more pathetic as various family members threaten and beat on her. Mosley is doing some great work with dementia and memory with his historical fiction bona fides firing away. The plot of Grey getting his memory back complete is little more than a device to explore how memory works and the man's story from coming up from the south and his cousin robbing the local white family (and getting murdered for his troubles).

The book seems to be going in a standard place and I'm not entirely believing the fact that the young woman that starts taking care of Grey is doing it for no other reason than she loves him. That relationship is a little too good to be true. Like maybe if she had a back story where she had to take care of others first. Still the journey to the ending and the kindness in some characters really helps to make the journey work.

It reminds me of RL's Dreams which was he described as a prose poem about Robert Johnson. Only I didn't understand that one as much because it remained in the skewed perspectives. Funny thing is I think I might like RL's Dreams better now. Anyhow, not one of his best works, but still pretty great.

72. Aliens Labyrinth by Jim Woodring and Killian Plunket - I remember there was a very clever twist in this book about what the mad scientist was doing with the aliens. Like he was figuring out a way to control them or he was trying to make hybrids. It was really cool. When I read it. It made the fact that it ends with a simple chase and fight disappointing.

73. Marvel Zombies vs. Army of Darkness by John Layman & Fabiano Neves - How many of these fucking Marvel Zombie books did they make? A ton apparently because they are bringing in the Evil Dead franchise. Ok. I'm being a little cranky and I really shouldn't be cranky because I genuinely liked this book. Ash wisecracking among the zombies has proven to be a formula that works. Dr. Doom is really getting upgraded these days. Hulk promising to use the Book of the Dead as toilet paper- ok that made me smile. So this is a book that I don't even remember now. I suspect that if I pick it up in a few years I won't even remember that I read it.

74.The Joker War by James Tyrion IV and Various - Fuck this book. It wastes a bunch of characters and made for boring reading in the related titles. It's got some value as the movie theater full of Joker victims makes for a creepy image, but there's nothing new. This is just "Batman loses all his resources and needs to figure out how to fight without his toys" and that's been told. Granted, there's a lot about his Bat Family (I still remember in the 80s when killing off Jason Todd was a big deal because Batman should be a lone wolf. And Batgirl gets crippled for life. But then he gets a Robin. And Jason Todd comes back. And Batgirl gets better but by that time her role as Oracle became more important so it's a little bit of a betrayal).

Anyhow I'm not so angry because of this thing being egregiously bad but it promised just enough to disappoint. And it also seems like there are missing chapters.

75. Epic Collection: Powerman & Ironfist by John Byrne et al. - Ok. Time to lower one's expectations. We are going into the Bronze Age of comics. Many classics came out of this era but like with Golden Age Science Fiction, for the most part you have to give them some benefit of the doubt. For example, these were written to be single issues that people bought every month. Sometimes they missed a month. Other times they bought comics at random because comics were actually affordable at the time ($5 for a single issue!!!???? Fuck you Marvel. Even $2.99 is ridiculous. You fuckers aren't even making money with these comics so why jack up the prices so much. The comic books exist for the billion dollar movie industry to retain copyright). So almost every issue needed to stop the action in order to tell everyone what they missed. Out of the 22 page comic at least 2 pages are devoted to "Luke Cage was in prison and they gave him the formula" or the past couple issues. I used to call it "Writing the Marvel Comics way" especially when I read the first three Left Behind books and got annoyed with them repeating plot points every 100 pages or so. Like the same book.

So given that caveat, these books are pretty good. Had I been reading comic books in the 1970s I would have loved them. They even included the joke about Luke Cage having to buy new shirts from the same tailor all the time. Complete with the punchline of Dr. Banner showing up for his order of purple pants. I was impressed with how much the stories were part of 1970s New York with characters based on the figures that were discussed in American Gangster. Oh sure, these crime bosses had robot armies but it was still grounded in that local scene that made Luke Cage and Iron Fist so great for Netflix tv shows.

Not perfect but definitely a fun read. The only problem I have is that it is too long and the Marvel writing style does get tiresome. http://www.patreon.com/timlieder
high school reunion

Preview of a very boring blog post

So another client is hesitant to pay. I spent the last two days writing her homework for her education class and even though she knew that it was much longer than anything she has ever sent me, she thinks that $225 is too much. That was the last I heard from her.

I gave her the option to pay $125 now and the rest next week. I haven't heard from her.

So if I don't get paid or at least a promise to pay by tomorrow morning (24 hours after the last correspondence) I'm posting a very long homework assignment and naming the person who hired me.

6-evaluation-for-boricua
high school reunion

Books read in 2021 # 66-70 - A stack of comic books

66. Paper Girls 2 by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang - I think this book is starting to lose its focus. Brian K. Vaughan may be the Robert Altman of comic books for me where I have no middle ground with his work. Either love or hate. I love Saga and I really can't see the point to Y the Last Man. So what works in this comic is Erin Tieng talking to herself from 25 years in the future/past with the adult Erin annoyed by her teenage self as teenager Erin tells her not to swear and openly shows horror at the fact that her adult self takes pills for anxiety. That's a beautiful story buried in a lot of time travel war stuff that is confusing and annoying. Vaughan wrote Lost right? This reminds me of the way that Lost got lost in its own mythology. I guess it can improve. I will probably read the next one. But it needs more character and way less time travel bullshit.

67. Jupiter's Legacy 2 (or 4) by Mark Millar & Frank Quitely - So here's the battle where the "villains" fight the "heroes" and everyone deals with their fathers, especially the one without powers finding out that his dad is still alive. There's more action and less character building than the previous chapter but it's all good. I love the cleverness of the characters and Chloe's arc from party girl to responsible mother and fighter for all humanity against the egotists in her family is still great. Since I'm reading the prequel series, I'm looking for Blue Bolt clues in this one but besides the main guy getting his teleportation stick.

68. Invisible Kingdom: Walking the Path by G. Willow Wilson & Christian Ward - So this one looks great so good for you Christian Ward but the story isn't grabbing me. A nun finds out that her mother superior is making deals and is horrified which is weird because where does she think all the security and resources come from. So she teams up with a ship captain. It all takes a long way to get there. This is disappointing because I really liked Ms Marvel. But you know Wilson wants to do different things and they can't all be great. And I'm sure this has fans. I'm not one of them.

69.I Only Have Eye for You by Heather Nuhfer & Kellee Riley - Ok, why do I find Japanese romance comics cute and love stories in superhero comics adorable and yet this thing isn't hitting that spot. I know it wants to be cute and I guess maybe that's why it doesn't hit so hard for me. I like this one but it just never seemed to hit the same way. It's a high school full of monsters and they are all trying to hook up to go to the dance. They have problems. But these problems ultimately turn out to be advantages.

70.Lover Boys by Gilbert Hernandez - I think that this will ultimately become tied into the rest of the Love & Rockets series, like maybe a movie starring one of the characters. But it seems like Gilbert's best work with a teacher seducing various guys in the town while the kids are trying to dynamite things. I like this one but it's too familiar without feeling essential. The light storytelling that turns very dark with suicides and explosions and people getting each other pregnant and running off. But I've seen this before and better. http://www.patreon.com/timlieder